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University of Oregon

Course Descriptions

100-level General Education courses

HPHY 101 Exercise as Medicine (4 credits)

The effects of exercise on health and in the prevention and treatment of disease.

In this course, students will learn what it means to be fit and make a plan to meet your own fitness and health goals, learn the basics of cardiorespiratory, muscle, and flexibility fitness, understand body composition – how it is determined and how you can alter it, understand nutrition and how it impacts your wellness and weight, understand the physiology of stress and how to manage it, learn risk factors, prevention, and treatment of chronic diseases. This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

HPHY 102 Exercise and Wellness across the Life Span (4)

Processes affecting physical activity and exercise from infancy through elder adulthood. Topics include physiological, sensory-motor, and cognitive factors across the life span.

Causes of U.S. mortality and morbidity have changed dramatically in the last one hundred years. Compared to infectious diseases at the turn of last century, lifestyle factors contribute to the vast majority of premature death and disease. In this course, students will consider the extent to which exercise, diet, drug and sexual choices impact immediate and long-range health. While examining the public impact of health choices such as physical activity, fad diets, and tobacco use, students will also be encouraged to integrate course concepts of disease prevention into their personal practices.

The course begins with an overview of on adaptation physical exercise. Questions addressed include the extent to which strength training, cardio-respiratory training, flexibility training and ergogenic aids facilitate health promotion and disease prevention. This is followed with coverage of dietary and nutrition questions related to weight management, disordered eating and health concerns surrounding special or fad diets. Finally, issues surrounding stress and sexual health choices are examined. Referencing the Health Center Survey, the health status and practices of University of Oregon students will be compared to national data on variety of controllable and non-controllable health risk factors. Great emphasis will be placed on critical examination of health messages, fads, and misconceptions and that abound in popular culture.

This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

HPHY 103 Exercise and Performance (4)

This class covers the basic structure and function of the human body as it relates to exercise and sports performance.

This course focuses on the study of exercise as it relates to human performance.  One of the primary goals of exercise is to help an individual perform better at a task.  The physiological underpinnings of this relationship will be investigated with respect to several systems of the body, mainly focusing on the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems.  In addition to covering the basic physiology of these systems, topics include: work, power and energy; physiology of training; factors affecting performance; and assessment of performance.  Students can expect a fair amount of technical depth for the topics covered.

This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

HPHY 104 Understanding Human Disease (4)

Introduces fundamental physiological and anatomical concepts to nonscience majors, to better understand disease and how humans adapt to create solutions to environmental challenges.

Anatomy and systems physiology are two fundamental areas of the biological sciences that describe the structure of the organs of the human body and the manner in which they function individually and synergistically. Study of these disciplines has considerable practical value, as they form the basis of modern clinical medicine. With this in mind, the primary objectives of the course are to introduce non-sciences majors to the foundations of the physiology and anatomy of the major organs and systems in the human body and the technology used to evaluate their function. They will also be taught to use their knowledge to better understand the etiology of health and disease, appreciate how humans adapt to a wide range of environmental challenges, and evaluate the myths and facts associated with the disease treatment and prevention strategies that guide 21st century medicine. Our final objective for the course is to provide our students with skills to ensure that they can use their new-found knowledge in anatomy and physiology to evaluate what they see and hear in the popular literature and media.

In each of the ten weeks of the term, students will be introduced to fundamental physiological and anatomical concepts of a specific body system and trained to use that information as a basis for creating a better understanding of disease and how humans adapt to environmental challenges. Patho-physiologies and common diseases will be presented from the perspective that they represent either over- or under-function of a normal organ/tissue system. Students will ultimately understand that having basic knowledge of fundamental physiology and anatomy allows one to understand and demystify many of the common diseases that are part of our everyday lives. Topics include how condition like bronchitis, lung cancer, and sickle cell anemia impair lung function, as well as an explanation of the physiological consequences of a compromised immune system in HIV patients. Anomalies such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes will be discussed and the manner in which physical activity can act therapeutically on these conditions will be presented.

Use of their practical, cause-and-effect approach to the sickness will assist the non-science major in gaining an appreciation of not only the fundamental aspects of basic anatomy and physiology, but also the complexities of body structure and function without the need for extensive course work in these areas.

This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

HPHY 105 Principles of Nutrition (4)

Explore the fundamentals of nutrition and its application to culture, lifestyle, and health as they relate to humans across the lifespan.

This class has been designed both to meet nutrition requirements for students seeking health science careers and to educate students about the importance of nutrition to their overall health and wellness. The course goals include mastery of the physiology related to human digestion, as well as an understanding of both macro and micro nutrients and their importance in human health. This class will then help students tackle the questions of how to gain weight, lose weight and prevent chronic diseases by examining scientific research and scientific reasoning. This course satisfies the criteria for group status in the sciences in that it introduces students to the foundations of human nutrition as a scientific discipline that overlaps with the science disciplines of human physiology, medicine, and public health.

Students will increase their depth of nutrition knowledge in discussion sections as they gain practical application and practice their verbal skills in relaying scientific information. They will also learn to use a critical eye when examining media recommendations of nutrition. Students will be encouraged to retain the information they are learning via one in-class examination, and a cumulative final exam.

This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

HPHY 111 The Science of Sex (4)

The anatomy and physiology of sex, with assignments and discussions designed to develop scientific literacy.

This 100-level course has been designed for non-science majors fulfilling their science groupsatisfying requirement. The objectives of the course are to 1) empower non-science majors with the tools that science literacy offers them to answer questions about their own health and wellness and 2) provide students with the resources to better understand human anatomy and physiology as it relates to sexual function. The course will include daily preparatory assignments that set the stage for active learning in the classroom. In addition, each student will pursue a unique topic and then design and conduct their own mini-research project, concluding with dissemination of their findings to the class. The course will use science journalist Mary Roach’s book “Bonk: the curious coupling of science and sex” as a scaffolding and beginning point for further exploration. This course will include frank, open
and scientific discussions on topics that are often ignored due to culture stigma, but have a great impact on human health and wellness. Students should come prepared for lively, light-hearted, brazen, direct, scientifically accurate and interesting preparatory assignments and discussions on the anatomy and physiology of human sexual function.

This course satisfies a group requirement for SCIENCE. The course format is lecture and small group discussion.

200-level Required of Major

HPHY 211 Medical Terminology (3)

Explore and develop skills in language and terminology specific to the medical sciences with an emphasis on derivation, meaning, and pronunciation.

This course is designed to give the student a solid, basic overview of terminology used in the medical, health, and biological sciences fields. The class presents prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, pleural forms, special forms, abbreviations, and symbols of common medical terms. An emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation, spelling and usage in order to more effectively communicate in a medical, health, or science field. Students will develop their skills in correct use of medical terminology while building a strong cognitive understanding of both its technical meaning and clinical application.

HPHY 212 Evidence, Inference, and Biostatistics (4)

This course is designed as a critical, first look into the core philosophy and principles of learning and investigation in human physiology.

The primary objectives are to help students build a practical foundation of process and content on which success in upper division courses and independent study/research can be supported, and the connection between laboratory science and the practice of medicine established. The course will emphasize practical activities that will help students think as scientists, gather/manage data, and facilitate its translation into useful questions and conclusions. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how new physiology knowledge is created; describe how new physiology knowledge is communicated to scientists and the general public; perform basic statistical tests; fulfill the requirements necessary to participate in human subjects research; discuss the key factors necessary for navigating a Human Physiology major at the University of Oregon; and demonstrate the keys steps required for lab reports.

 

300-level Required of Major

HPHY 321 Human Anatomy I (5)

Introduction to the human body and histology; nerves; central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous systems; cranial nerves; regional anatomy of the head; special senses. Includes cadaver laboratory.

This course will use both a system & regional approach to uncover the anatomy of the skull, brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, facial muscles, special senses (auditory and visual systems), vertebral column, thoracic skeleton, and muscles of the trunk. You will first become comfortable with the language of anatomy and learn about the tissues that make up the body. You will uncover information throughout the term and put this material together in your own unique anatomy resource, called your “External Brain”. Discussions in lecture will explore head injuries, concussions, cranial nerve dysfunction, lesions of the spinal cord, and the musculoskeletal system of the trunk. The laboratory experience will complement the lecture material, and allow us the unique opportunity to explore preserved and prosected human bodies, obtained through the OHSU Medical School, in addition to anatomical models and charts.

HPHY 321 Anatomy Syllabus F13

HPHY 322 Human Physiology I (5)

Neuro- and muscular physiology: action potentials; synapses and receptors; skeletal muscle; central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems; special senses. Includes human-based laboratory.

The focus of this course will be the nervous system, muscle physiology, and special senses. Discussions will include ion movement, action potentials, synapses & receptors, the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems, excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle and the mechanisms specific to vision, hearing, smell & taste, in addition to the somatosensory system. Information will be uncovered as you create your own unique book called your “External Brain”, which you will use both in class and during examinations as you apply your knowledge to novel clinical scenarios. Complementary laboratory experiences will provide the opportunity to collect data on yourself and lab-mates using the PowerLab system. Our goal is for you to become deeply knowledgeable about human physiology, and be able to apply the information you have compiled to clinical or research situations.

HPHY 323 Human Anatomy II (5)

Heart, lungs, and vasculature in addition to regional exploration of the musculoskeletal system. Includes cadaver laboratory.

This course will use both a system & regional approach to uncover the anatomy of the heart, respiratory, lymphatic and the appendicular musculoskeletal system. You will uncover information throughout the term and put this material together in your own unique anatomy resource, called your “External Brain”. Discussions in lecture will explore heart valve dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, coronary blood flow, mechanics of respiration, and the anatomy of the upper & lower extremities. The laboratory experience will complement the lecture material, and allow us the unique opportunity to explore preserved and prosected human bodies, obtained through the OHSU Medical School, in addition to anatomical models and charts.

HPHY 324 Human Physiology II (5)

Cardiovascular system; respiratory system; immunology. Includes human-based laboratory.

The focus of this course will be the cardiovascular, respiratory and immune systems. Discussions will include the electrophysiology of the heart, cardiac cycle, smooth muscle control, blood pressure regulation, the components of blood, innate & acquired immunity, mechanics of ventilation-perfusion matching and control of respiration. Information will be uncovered as you create your own unique book called your “External Brain”, which you will use both in class and during examinations as you apply your knowledge to novel clinical scenarios. Complementary laboratory experiences will provide the opportunity to collect data with lab-mates using the PowerLab system. Our goal is for you to become deeply knowledgeable about human physiology, and be able to apply the information you have compiled to clinical situations.

HPHY 325 Human Anatomy and Physiology III (5)

Anatomy and physiology of the digestive, reproductive, and renal systems; endocrinology. Includes combination of cadaver laboratory and human-based laboratory.

This course will use both a systems & regional approach to uncover the anatomy and physiology of the digestive, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, and integument systems. Discussions in lecture will explore related clinical topics, including: ulcers, cirrhosis of the liver, fluid balance, acid/base regulation, kidney failure, diabetes, pituitary gland dysfunction, and the physiology of the female orgasm, reproductive cycle and pregnancy. The laboratory experience will complement the lecture material, and allow us the unique opportunity to explore preserved and prosected human bodies, obtained through the OHSU Medical School, in addition to anatomical models and charts.

HPHY 371 Physiology of Exercise (4)

Physiology of exercise, physical conditioning, and training: significance of these effects for health and performance.

The physiology of exercise includes studying the physiological effects and responses by the body to the stressor of exercise. This course will focus on some of the fundamental concepts of exercise physiology such as how different energy systems allow the human body to supply energy for activities less than 30 seconds up to hours of exercise. Central to exercise physiology is the understanding of how the body is able to transport oxygen to liberate energy for use by the working muscles. We will also focus on how the metabolic, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems respond to the demands of exercise and how routine exercise (i.e., exercise training) modifies these systems, and the significance of these effects for health and performance.

300-level Electives

HPHY 333 Motor Control (4)

Introduction to the processes of control and coordination in the performance of motor skills. Neurophysioloical, mechanical, and cognitive bases of motor skill acquisition.

This course provides an overview of the role of the brain and nervous system in the control of human movement. In this course, students will gain a better understanding of the neurophysiological principles underlying movement behavior. Concepts in sensory and motor systems physiology will be discussed in the context of the control of balance, locomotion and other skilled movements. These fundamental concepts of normal motor control will also be applied to understand motor deficits in clinical populations. We will also focus on motor learning and skill acquisition, with an emphasis on applications to motor development and rehabilitation.

HPHY 362 Tissue, Injury, and Repair (4)

Exploration of the physiology of injury and trauma. Emphasis on inflammation and healing of connective tissue injury as well as therapeutic strategies and rationale.

This course involves three major components: 1. musculoskeletal injury as the result of trauma and the associated inflammatory and tissue repair processes, 2. tissue biomechanics (e.g. bone, ligament, tendon behavior when under physiological load and what mechanisms lead to injury), and 3. orthopaedic assessment of musculoskeletal injury (including mechanisms of injury for specific joint structures, signs and symptoms of these injuries, and relevant prognosis.  The general theme across the term is considering how anatomical and neuromechanical factors lead to musculoskeletal injury, how to assess these injuries, and what factors might influence acute and long term care.

HPHY 381 Biomechanics (4)

Fundamental principles of physics applied to the analysis of human movement. Emphasis on developing abilities to analyze human movements quantitatively.

This course provides an introduction to the principles of biomechanics, emphasizing the contribution of biomechanics to understanding human movement, and development of mechanical and anatomical concepts related to human performance. Upon completion of this course, each student should be able to use precise, well-defined terminology to describe motion; understand how to use Newton’s laws to study forces and torques; analyze the mechanical properties of biological tissues; understand and quantify linear and angular descriptors of human motion (kinematics); understand the relationship between linear and angular characteristics of motion; understand and quantify the basic causes of human movement (kinetics).

400-level Electives

HPHY 401 Research

HPHY 403 Thesis (1-4)

For honors students during the terms in which they conduct research or write a thesis.

HPHY 404 Internship (1-15)

Field experience in an agency, institution, or business. Practice knowledge from courses: planning, organizing, directing, evaluating, and developing professional competence.

HPHY 405 Reading and Conference (1-15)

Reading and assignments in connection with other courses for extra credit. Honors Readings.

HPHY 406 Special Problems

HPHY 408 Workshop

HPHY 409 Anatomy/Physiology Teaching Assistant

Opportunities to actively participate in the Department of Human Physiology’s undergraduate teaching mission are available through various Teaching Assistant (TA) positions.

TA positions are available for both the Anatomy and the Physiology course series, during the academic year and summer, as outlined below.

The Laboratory TA will actively participate in one weekly lab section, attend a weekly TA prep session, complete weekly lab preparation assignments, follow and support the course teaching philosophy.

The Peer Tutor TA will facilitate informal student learning by holding drop-in office hours in the Anatomy & Physiology study room (located in the Science Library), prompt student discussion during lecture, and engage in online student discussion board posts. Peer tutors will prepare for each class by completing External Brain assignments and meeting weekly with the course instructor.

The Lecture Grader TA will assist with the grading of External Brain assignments and short answer exam questions.

 

HPHY 409 Practicum (1-15)

Current topics include Preoccupational Therapy and Prephysical Therapy.

HPHY 420/520 Human Cadaver Dissection (1)

In-depth study and dissection of one region of a preserved human cadaver. Interested applicants must complete 300-level Anatomy courses & apply early February.

This experience focuses on the dissection of a preserved human body for HPHY 321, 323, and 325 courses through isolation of specific anatomical structures. The goal is to provide the dissection student an opportunity to explore the human anatomy as it unfolds from the superficial through the deep tissues of the body. Students spend week 1-4 in independent study investigating the region of the body they have been assigned, making notes on the tissues they will uncover layer by layer, and preparing dissection plans. Weeks 5-10 will be spent in the cadaver lab performing anatomy dissection. Applications are due early February, and students are selected based on current major/minor, academic standing, academic performance and ability to work independently. Applicants must have completed the 300-level anatomy lecture and lab sequence. Approximately 80 spots are available in total each spring term (65 undergraduate, 15 graduate).

400-level Capstone

HPHY 410/421 Pathophysiology (4)

Explore the cellular pathogenesis of disease in representative diseases of the endocrine, renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

Pathophysiology is a clinically oriented, hybrid lecture/lab course. The course is designed to clinically complement and expand upon the principles covered in the Human Physiology sequence (HPHY 322, 324, and 325). The course offers the broad spectrum of pre-medical (nursing, dental, medical, physical therapy, osteopathic, etc…) students the opportunity to explore the cellular pathogenesis of disease and gain skill in diagnostic decision making. Representative diseases of the endocrine, renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems will be covered. The student will work alone and in groups to arrive at evidenced based conclusions drawn from case histories, serum metabolic panels and other diagnostic and lab tests.

HPHY 410/422 Physiology of Obesity

Investigates the metabolic adaptations that occur in response to chronic over-nutrition leading to obesity and molecular basis for the development of insulin resistance. 

This integrated lecture/discussion course will allow students to develop an integrative understanding of the cellular and molecular changes in metabolism that occur with obesity. This course will expand upon HPHY 325 and 371 as it requires integration of this material and basic biochemistry to understand the complex hormonal regulation of metabolism. Specifically, we will investigate the elegant coordination of tissues and key cellular signaling pathways that function in each to control glucose and lipid metabolism in fed and fasted state in typical lean individuals contrasted with the metabolic impairments that occur in typical obese individuals. The class will also explore the complexities of identifying the cause(s) of the obesity epidemic, the science (or not) behind different weight loss strategies, and prevention programs. This course will rely heavily on primary research articles to explore the current theories in obesity sciences and to develop a working knowledge of laboratory techniques commonly used in metabolic research.

HPHY 410/443 Clinical Pharmacology (4)

Introduction to pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion), pharmacodynamics, therapeutic considerations and adverse effects of select prototypes drugs.

Clinical pharmacology is a clinically oriented, hybrid lecture/lab course that examines the pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion), pharmacodynamics, therapeutic considerations and adverse effects of select prototypes from within each drug family. The student will work alone and in groups to arrive at evidenced based conclusions drawn from clinical case studies.

HPHY 410/475 Science of Athletic Performance (4)

Investigate how athletes and coaches apply exercise physiology concepts to training and performance enhancement

This integrated lecture/lab course explores the physiology behind training methods used by elite level athletes and coaches to test athlete physiology, train specific physiological systems, and enhance athletic performance, specifically focusing on endurance performance. This course will expand on concepts learned in Physiology of Exercise (HPHY 371), by exploring the most recent practical techniques scientific literature in endurance performance. Students will use the equipment in the Bowerman Sports Science Clinic to gain hands-on experience in physiological testing which may include: body composition, maximal oxygen consumption, lactate threshold, anaerobic capacity, and pulmonary function testing. Depending on scheduling, some testing may be conducted on collegiate athletes. Students will also explore the physiological basis and scientific support for training methods used by elite athletes and coaches. Discussion of ergogenic aids and nutritional supplements will help students develop an understanding of the range of components affecting athletic performance. This course will provide students with the skills to conduct physiological assessments that are used both in clinical and athlete populations, as well as the skills to critically evaluate proposed physiologic mechanisms. Students will come away from the course with an understanding of how to test athletic fitness and apply training programs to improve specific areas of fitness. “The thinking must be done first, before the training begins.” (Peter Coe)

HPHY 410/480 Technology Development in Human Physiology (4)

Provides a foundation in principles of intellectual property, technology development and transfer, critical to technology development in clinical and sport industries.

This integrated lecture/discussion course will provide a foundation in the principles of intellectual property, technology development and transfer, specific to the scientific disciplines within the Human Physiology Department. Students will develop analytical skills critical to initial technology development in clinical and sport industries. The course is designed to allow students to develop an understanding of the systems in academia and industry in place to facilitate technology development. Students are also exposed to laboratory-based needs assessments and experimental designs needed to rigorously test their novel solutions. This course is designed to expand on and apply basic physiological principles taught in HPHY 371 and HPHY 381.

HPHY 412/512 Sleep Physiology (4)

Fundamental principles of sleep and how physiology is affected by sleep.

This class examines the fundamental principles of sleep and how it affects physiology; specifically, homeostasis is maintained in NREM but not in REM Sleep. This integrated lecture/lab course will allow the students to develop an understanding of the complexities of homeostatic mechanisms in multiple physiologic systems.  Homeostasis is a fundamental principle of physiology, yet during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep the body loses the ability to maintain homeostasis meaning one of two things: Either “sleep is the biggest mistake evolution has ever made” or sleep is so important that we are willing to temporarily give up the ability to maintain homeostasis to get sleep.  This course will investigate which one of these statements is correct. This course will also introduce the students to the most recent developments/ideas in many areas of integrative physiology as they pertain to sleep and maintenance of homeostasis. This course is designed to expand upon HPHY 321-325, as it requires integration of this material to understand the complex physiological processes of homeostasis in humans and animals.  Furthermore, this course requires students to apply themselves via hands-on polysomnographic measurements of sleep in healthy humans (physiology) and in patients with sleep disorders (pathophysiology). HPHY 325 is prerequisite to this course.

HPHY 413/513 Muscle Structure, Function, & Plasticity (4)

Physiologic basis for skeletal muscle adaptation to increased and decreased use and injury. Emphasizes how structure dictates function relevant to rehabilitation.

This course will cover skeletal muscle cell/tissue physiology with a focus on adaptation to increased and decreased use, and response to injury using experimental conditions that demonstrate how structure dictates function. Chapter 1 will cover muscle development and anatomy as the significance of structure throughout the course. Chapter 2 will focus on mechanical and physiological properties of skeletal muscle, including muscle structure-functional relationships and neuromuscular system. Chapter 3 focuses on the way muscles, tendons, and joints interact to produce movement and integrate the information form chapters 1 and 2. Chapter 4  presents various models of increased use and detailing the various cellular responses to experimental conditions resulting in adaptive change to ‘increased use.’ Chapter 5 describes models of decreased use and how muscle cells adapt. Chapter 6 will cover the response to injury and integrate clinical manifestations of increased, decreased use with injury response, i.e., Ch 4-6. Relevant journal articles will be integrated with chapters 4-6 that will emphasize rehabilitation and biomedical application.

HPHY 414/514 Muscle Cell Metabolism (4)

Metabolic basis for skeletal muscle adaptation to increased and decreased use, and injury models. Emphasizes inter-organ communication; uses clinical models.

This course will cover skeletal muscle cell/tissue metabolism with a focus on adaptation to increased and decreased use, and response to injury using experimental conditions that demonstrate how skeletal muscle serves as the primary amino acid reservoir for whole body homeostasis. The first half of this course will cover basic skeletal muscle biochemistry and metabolism from selected book chapters and primary research articles. We will cover bioenergetics; ATP homeostasis; glycogenolysis and glycolysis; cellular oxidation of Pyruvate and Lactate; lipid metabolism; metabolism of proteins and amino acids. The second half of this course will use primary journal articles covering muscle metabolism as it relates to muscle protein anabolism and catabolism, starvation, immobilization with clinically relevant examples and how functional mobility is affected in young and older populations.

HPHY 417/517 Hypertension (4)

Investigates clinical and experimental observations underlying the mechanisms of chronic high blood pressure and clinical therapies used for treatment. Emphasizes integration of theory and practice.

This integrated lecture/discussion course will allow the students to develop an understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders. This course will also introduce the students to the most recent developments/ideas in many areas of integrative physiology as they pertain to the long term regulation of arterial pressure. This course is designed to expand upon HPHY 322, 324, and 325 as it requires integration of this material to understand the complex physiological processes governing the pathophysiology of high blood pressure in humans and animals.  Furthermore, this course requires students to apply their knowledge of cardiovascular and renal physiology by diagnosing types of hypertension in case based learning modules as well as developing a testable hypothesis about high blood pressure and designing an experiment to test that hypothesis. Weekly discussions will alternate with case based learning modules to enhance and deepen the understanding of the physiological principles underlying clinical and experimental scenarios. HPHY 325 is the prerequisite to this course.

HPHY 419/519 Alternative & Complementary Medicine (4)

Exploration of alternative and complementary medicine, including scientific evidence for the mechanisms underlying practices such as meditation, acupuncture, and yoga in improving health.

This course will focus on current topics in alternative and complementary medicine, including scientific evidence for the efficacy of such practices as acupuncture, meditation, tai chi, yoga, traditional Chinese medicine, Naturopathic medicine, Homeopathic medicine and Chiropractic medicine in improving health and well-being in a variety of populations, including young adults, older adults and patient populations.

HPHY 433/533 Neurophysiology of Concussion (4)

Investigate diagnosis, deficits, and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury and neurophysiological effects.

This lecture/discussion course will uncover many topics surrounding cerebral concussion, or “mild” traumatic brain injury, including (but not limited to):  epidemiology, mechanism(s) of injury, functional (motor & cognitive) deficits, assessment (neuropsychological, imaging/structural, motor), treatment, rehabilitation, long-term dysfunction, and “return to play” guidelines. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the underlying neurophysiological effects, structural changes, and the functional deficits associated with concussion. As such, you will be expected to utilize and integrate your knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, and motor control to understand the complexities of brain injury. By the end of this course, you will understand and be able to articulate the most recent developments, research, and controversies surrounding this rapidly changing and dynamic field.

HPHY 434/534 Movement Disorders (4)

Discusses the clinical manifestations and underlying physiological mechanisms of selected movement disorders. Emphasizes the role of scientific experiment in diagnosis and treatment.

This integrated lecture/discussion course will allow students to develop an understanding of the physiology underlying selected movement disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and stroke. In this course we will explore neuromuscular principles and the most recent scientific research developments guiding diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Students are also exposed to laboratory-based experimental design to further enhance the understanding and appreciation of advancements in diagnostic and treatment procedures. This course is designed to expand on and apply basic physiological principles taught in HPHY 325 and HPHY 333.

HPHY 441 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3)

Principles of exercise physiology integrated into the clinical setting, with emphasis on cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases.

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of pathophysiology, diagnosis, exercise prescription and rehabilitation of the most prevalent chronic diseases. The primary emphasis will be on cardiac, pulmonary and vascular diseases, but will include an introduction to other special populations. A specific focus will be on modalities used in cardiac, pulmonary and vascular rehabilitation. HPHY 371 is a prerequisite for this course.

HPHY 442 Clinical ECG/EKG (4)

Exploration of heart conduction, arrhythmia, and clinical significance of electrocardiography with an emphasis on clinical application.

This course is designed to give the student a solid, basic overview of electrocardiography (ECG/EKG). Although the course will review heart anatomy and physiology, it is expected that students have a solid grasp of the heart before the start of class. The focus of the course is on the exploration of physiology and pathophysiology of various rhythms of heart conduction. Sinus, atrial, junctional, and ventricular rhythms as well as heart blocks will be studied. Bundle branch blocks and hemi-blocks, myocardial infarctions, electrolyte abnormalities and EKG’s from other coronary and non-coronary conditions will be presented. Students will be presented with case studies and asked to identify underlying conditions, rhythms and appropriate treatments. The diagnostic role EKG plays in a clinical setting will be emphasized.

HPHY 460 Lumbar and Pelvic Functional Anatomy (4)

Application of evidence-based approach to  understanding the anatomy and biomechanics of lumbar spine and pelvis and its relationship to health and disease.

This course is designed to help prepare both health care practitioners and those interested in related fields in the assessment and management of region. The course is intended to advance the student’s knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics of the lumbar spine and pelvis in health and disease.  It will begin by introducing discussing the impact of and prevalence of low back pain in human society.  It will advance to discussing in detail the embryology of lumbopelvic structures and proceed to build these structures into their adult form. A detailed description of all ligaments, joints, nerves and muscles of the region will be discussed. Key concepts of the biomechanics involved in normal daily activities will be addressed in sufficient detail. The course will proceed in second half to the current understandings of low back pain and management of  the condition.

HPHY 462 Therapeutic Techniques (4)

Clinical application of therapeutic techniques including modalities and rehabilitation for soft-tissue orthopedic injuries.

The course is intended to advance the student’s knowledge of tissue injury and repair by introducing the clinical application of therapeutic techniques including modalities and rehabilitation.  Therapeutic modalities comprise the application of superficial heat, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy, cryokinetics, and massage.  Rehabilitation to focus on manual, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and stretching techniques, in addition to open and closed kinetic chain exercises, plyometrics and aquatic therapy.

HPHY 470/570 Environmental Physiology (4)

Examination of physiological adaptations to acute and chronic exposure to extreme heat, cold, and high altitude.

The overall goal of this class is for you to learn how the human body adapts to acute and chronic challenges imposed on it by the environment. We will consider what happens when you find yourself stranded in the desert without water, caught out in a blizzard, or trapped under ice. We will discuss why an elite mountaineer can climb Mt. Everest without supplemental oxygen, yet when an aircraft depressurizes at the same altitude, its occupants lose consciousness in seconds. We will learn about the limits of the human body, and how to push those limits to the extreme. Emphasis will be placed on learning the underlying concepts of environmental physiology, the evidence that supports them, and how they can be applied to advance human health and performance. You will be evaluated on your ability to write and speak using the vocabulary and concepts in this area of study and your ability to integrate theory and practice.

HPHY 472 Advanced Labs in Exercise Physiology (4)

Theoretical basis and practical application of modern physiological testing of cardiovascular and respiratory function with a focus on exercise and performance.

This integrated lecture/lab course will explore the theoretical basis and practical application of modern physiological testing of cardiovascular and respiratory function with a focus on exercise and performance. It is designed to expand upon the concepts learned in Physiology of Exercise (HPHY 371) and apply them via hands-on physiological testing of body composition, maximal oxygen consumption, lactate threshold, anaerobic capacity, and pulmonary function. This course will provide students with an advanced level of understanding of exercise physiology and the fundamental knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform testing in the healthy individual. The exposure to state-of-the-art testing equipment that this course provides to students allows them to gain practical skills that are widely sought in the healthcare industry. In addition, the physical interaction with other students as mock clients creates a real-world scenario that ideally complements theories learned in the classroom.

HPHY 473/572 High Altitude Medicine & Physiology (4)

Explores major physiologic responses to high altitude (hypoxia), both adaptive and maladaptive, from systems to molecular level, as well as pathophysiologic conditions at high altitude.

This integrated lecture/lab/discussion course will allow the students to develop an understanding of the physiological adaptations that occur in response to ascent to high altitude (or low oxygen, hypoxia).  This course will also introduce the students to the most recent developments/ideas in many areas of integrative physiology as they pertain to hypoxia and high altitude. This course is designed to expand upon HPHY 325  as it requires integration of this material to understand the complex physiological processes of human and animal adaptation to low oxygen.  Furthermore, this course  requires students to apply themselves via hands-on physiological testing in low oxygen conditions as part of their laboratory component of the course.  Students will measure hypoxic ventilatory responses, maximal oxygen consumption and cardiovascular responses to hypoxia, perform cognitive function tests and investigate the mechanisms controlling cerebral blood flow in hypoxia. A discussion will alternate each week with the labs to enhance and deepen the understanding of the physiological responses tested during the prior laboratory experiment. HPHY 325 is prerequisite to this course

HPHY 485/585 Gait Analysis (4)

Study of walking including the impairments and functional limitations contributing to disabilities. Provides fundamental terminology, techniques, and data interpretation used in gait analysis.

Gait analysis is the systematic study of human walking. It provides the potential to determine those impairments and functional limitations that probably contribute to the waking disability. This course attempts to provide students a systematic introduction on this subject, including fundamental terminology, technique, and data interpretation used in gait analysis. By the completion of this course, students should possess a working knowledge of equipment and techniques used in gait analysis, understand fundamental aspects of three-dimensional joint kinematics & kinetics of the lower extremities during walking, and be aware of literature related to the field of gait analysis.

HPHY 486/586 Orthopedic Biomechanics (4)

Principles of musculoskeletal biomechanics relating to concepts in surgical and nonsurgical orthopedics. Course is beneficial to those pursuing careers in medicine and health sciences.

This course will build on the principles of musculoskeletal biomechanics to facilitate an understanding of key concepts in orthopedics.  This understanding should prove beneficial to those who are pursuing careers in the medical fields, specifically the orthopedic and physical medicine specialties. Upon completion of this course, each student should be able to quantify forces and moments of the musculoskeletal system as well as mechanical/material behavior of skeletal and muscular tissues and understand essential biomechanical and anatomical factors in joint implant design and be able to discuss the efficacy of implant systems.

600-level courses

HPHY 601 Research (variable credits)

HPHY 603 Dissertation (variable credits)

HPHY 605 Reading and Conference (variable credits)

HPHY 606 Special Problems (variable credits)

Selected problems in the field of human physiology.

HPHY 607 Seminar (variable credits)

HPHY 607 Seminar in Human Physiology (1)

HPHY 608 Workshop (variable credits)

HPHY 609 Practicum (variable credits)

HPHY 611 Professional Skills I: Effective Teaching (1)

Development of professional skills for academic careers related to human physiology.

This lecture/discussion course will explore various topics related to teaching at the College and University level. It is designed for Human Physiology graduate students, not only to support their current role as a Graduate Teaching Fellow but also to prepare them for teaching experiences they may engage in after graduate school. The course content will include both philosophical conversations about how learning occurs, as well as details regarding syllabus preparation and test design.

HPHY 612 Professional Skills II: Responsible Research (1)

Development of professional skills for academic careers related to human physiology.

This lecture/discussion course will explore various topics related to the responsible conduct of research. It is designed for Human Physiology graduate students, not only to support their current role as graduate researcher assistants but also to prepare them for research experiences they may engage in after graduate school. The course content will include both philosophical conversations about what constitutes responsible conduct in research, as well as details regarding regulations and documentation within academia and in the context of publishing and grant writing.

HPHY 613 Professional Skills III: Career Development (1)

Development of professional skills for academic careers related to human physiology.

This lecture/discussion course will explore various topics related to the career development within the field of human physiology. It is designed for Human Physiology graduate students to prepare them for engagement in academia after graduate school. The course content will include both philosophical conversations about career choices and career development, as well as details regarding post-graduate training, typical jobs in academia, the tenure and promotion process, CV building and interfacing with campus services such as research services and tech transfer.

HPHY 621 Systems Physiology I (4)

Advanced overview of neural physiology, neural control of human movement, and the biomechanical constraints underlying that control.

 The objective of this series of courses (HPHY 621, 622, 623) is to provide a scientific foundation for the study of human physiology at the graduate level.

This course will consider in depth the mechanisms underlying the neural control of human movement and the biomechanical constraints that are inherent in the human body. The anatomical and neurophysiological characteristics of different sensorimotor structures in the brain will be discussed. In addition, the forces acting at different joints in the body and the resulting kinematic characteristics resulting from those forces will be considered.

HPHY 622 Systems Physiology II (4)

Advanced overview of cardiovascular physiology and skeletal muscle cell physiology and metabolism.

The objective of this series of courses (HPHY 621, 622, 623) is to provide a scientific foundation for the study of human physiology at the graduate level.

This course will consider in depth the physiology of the cardiovascular system and skeletal muscle. First, we will explore heart rate generation, the cardiac pump, vasculature, and interactions between cardiac and vascular function. Then, we will explore skeletal muscle physiology from the system level to cell biology, gene expression, cell signaling and post-translational modifications that result in tissue level adaptations, e.g., plasticity. Additional emphasis will be placed on glucose, fat and protein metabolism within skeletal muscle.

HPHY 623 Systems Physiology III (4)

Advanced overview of renal and respiratory physiology.

The objective of this series of courses (HPHY 621, 622, 623) is to provide a scientific foundation for the study of human physiology at the graduate level.

This integrative physiology course will introduce graduate students to the essential information required to understand more advanced respiratory, renal, and cardiovascular physiological concepts so that students are prepared for further graduate study. This course will introduce students to current hypotheses and recent developments in many areas of renal physiology and long-term control of arterial pressure. This course will also introduce students to some of the most recent developments/ideas in many sub-areas of respiratory physiology as they pertain to pulmonary circulation, pulmonary gas exchange and neural control of breathing.

HPHY 660 Basic Science in Clinical Decisions (4)

Literature-based investigation into the basic science and clinical research underlying clinical decisions in athletic medicine.

HPHY 661 Manual Therapy: Movement Patterns, Core Stability (2)

Advanced skills in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) movement patterns, and both pilates principles and manual therapy to improve core stability.

HPHY 662 Manual Therapy: Spine, Lower Quadrant (2)

Advanced skills in muscle energy, mobilization, and trigger-point release techniques for the spine and lower quadrant.

HPHY 668 Physiology of Injury (4)

Physiological regulatory mechanisms controlling injury, inflammation, and pain. Therapeutic modalities used to mitigate the consequences of these responses that accompany physical activity.

HPHY 669 The Female Athlete (3)

Literature-based investigation into the unique negative and positive adaptations observed in women during acute and chronic exercise.

HPHY 670 Advanced Respiratory Physiology (4)

Explores advanced concepts in respiratory physiology; included exercise adaptations and examples of pathophysiology.

HPHY 671 Therapeutic Restoration of Biomotor Abilities (4)

HPHY 676 Human Cardiovascular Control (4)

Cardiovascular physiology, including central control of blood pressure and flow regulation. An integrative approach toward how the cardiovascular system is coordinated with overall body function.

HPHY 684 Kinematics of Human Movement (4)

Theory and application of kinematic analysis of human motion. Emphasis on two- and three- dimentional kinematics, including data collection, analysis, and modeling.

This course is the first of a two-course sequence in graduate biomechanics that also includes HPHY 685 (Kinetics of Human Motion).  This course will provide students with both theoretical and applied knowledge required to perform a kinematic analysis of human motion.  By the completion of this course, students should have a working understanding of the entire process of 2D and 3D kinematics, including data collection, filtering, analysis and modeling.

HPHY 685 Kinetics of Human Movement (4)

Experimental methods and mechanicsl theories associated with the analysis of joint forces and movements during human motion.

This course is the second of a two-course sequence in graduate biomechanics that also includes HPHY 684.  This course will continue discussion on kinetic analysis of human movement and will focus on quantitative analysis of human gait. Both theoretical and applied aspects of kinetic gait analysis will be addressed throughout this course. By the completion of this course, students should understand theoretical concepts of three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis of human motion, have hand-on experiences on performing data acquisition, processing, and analysis of selected human movement, and able to independently develop and conduct research projects from initial protocol planning to presentation of research findings.